Skin and Soft Tissue Infections | Clinical Medicine | Video Lectures | Medical V-Learning

Prime focus of this sqadia.com infectious disease lectures is the detailed explanation of Skin and Soft tissue infections. Skin and soft tissue infections have been common human afflictions in skin integumentary system. It explains the skin pathophysiology, cellulitis pathophysiology and…

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Prime focus of this sqadia.com infectious disease lectures is the detailed explanation of Skin and Soft tissue infections. Skin and soft tissue infections have been common human afflictions in skin integumentary system. It explains the skin pathophysiology, cellulitis pathophysiology and deep tissue infections.

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Watch complete lecture on sqadia.com:
https://www.sqadia.com/programs/skin-and-soft-tissue-infections

Lecture Duration: 00:53:41
Released: November 2019

Full List of Infectious Medicine Lectures:
https://www.sqadia.com/categories/medicine-infectious
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Skin and soft tissue infections occur in all races, all ethnic groups, and all geographic locations, although some have unique geographic niches. Infections associated with vesicles are smallpox, chickenpox, shingles and cold sores etc. Vesicle formation due to infection is caused by viral proliferation within the epidermis.

Staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS) in neonates is caused by a toxin (exfoliatin) from phage group II S. aureus. It is one of infections associated with Bullae. Impetigo contagiosa is caused by S. pyogenes, and bullous impetigo is due to S. aureus. Both skin lesions may have an early bullous stage but then appear as thick crusts with a golden-brown color. Hair follicles serve as portals for a number of bacteria, although S. aureus is the most common cause of localized folliculitis.

Sebaceous glands empty into hair follicles and ducts and, if these portals are blocked, form sebaceous cysts that may resemble staphylococcal abscesses or may become secondarily infected. Infection of sweat glands (hidradenitis suppurativa) also can mimic infection of hair follicles, particularly in the axillae.

Necrotizing fasciitis, formerly called streptococcal gangrene, may be associated with group A Streptococcus or mixed aerobic–anaerobic bacteria or may occur as a component of gas gangrene caused by Clostridium perfringens. S. pyogenes may induce primary myositis (referred to as streptococcal necrotizing myositis) in association with severe systemic toxicity.

Moreover, In the end of the lecture detailed diagnosis and a full description of the treatment of all the clinical entities described. As a guide to the clinician in selecting appropriate treatment, the antimicrobial agents useful in the most common and the most fulminant cutaneous infections are listed in table.
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